healing to worthiness

A writer friend recently asked me what was the genre of the book I’m working on and as I began to explain he offered a summarizing statement of “ohhhh, sounds like a self-help thing.”

Immediately I felt some irritation with his response, as if in the hierarchy of literature categorization self-help sinks near the very bottom somewhere between gossip columns and comics. Writing that somehow isn’t serious.

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After reflecting about this days later I wish I would have said, “well I don’t really resonate with the term self-help as that doesn’t reflect the immense diversity or deep potential in human evolution this genre has explored over the past 30+ years. I think something akin to the ‘exploration of quantum spirituality, human consciousness and transformation’ may be closer to the dynamics of self-guided change that this category of literature attempts to examine.”

But alas in that moment I laughed and shrugged off his words, inwardly hoping ‘it’ might be more than a ‘thing.’

Situations like this give me pause about my writing. No, they give me pause about my worthiness to write until I examine why I feel hesitant to contribute my talent in this area. (Check out this awesome video of Brene Brown and Oprah on worthiness.) I remind myself that I understand why the self-help genre receives this reaction from most folks. Many Americans are uncomfortable with the idea that they are responsible for their life and that they are the best experts about their inward journey. Our society loves to belittle us about our innate ability to trust ourselves and our experience. We assume babies don’t comprehend the world around them, that animals don’t have souls or trees consciousness and most adults cannot be responsible for their managing their own physical well-being. Why is this? Where did these beliefs come from? Who benefits from this paradigm?

The human transformation movement, also referred to as the New Age or New Thought movement, isn’t about ‘helping’ people. I don’t even believe that it’s about helping people help themselves. It’s about shifting the way all of us perceive, interact and engage with the world beyond a physical and mental duality paradigm. It’s pretty evident that our current ways of human interaction based on competition, greed, and fear have created a world that reflects these beliefs the majority has about the nature of humanity. This movement and its corresponding literature presents evidence, shares mental and spiritual technologies and describes personal stories of individuals who have transcended these old models of behavior/thinking and literally downloaded a new operating system.

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My book about self healing is in essence a book about self-transformation. About the very real and very challenging work of integrating a new way of behavior based on abundance, trust, compassion and love. In a world that continues to be dominated by so much violence, blame and anger I find that healing this mental virus is the most important work there is to do. More important than my job, more important than my parenting, more important than consuming endless amounts of stuff. Yes I continue to work, mother and buy AND I recognize that they are not the primary reason for me being on the planet.

And so I have to trust my worthiness to write my story of healing, 1) because it’s part of my healing journey and 2) because the world needs this voice. Just as it needs to hear everyone wake up and be a contribution to benefit all the entities who share this planet. I trust we’ll get there, because the SHIFT has already begun. Awakening to our worthiness and responsibility is just one page of the story.

Global-Awakening-–-Global-Awakenings-Quote-Our-purpose-has-nothing-to-do-with-what-we-want-out-of-life-it-has-everything-to-do-with-what-our-world-needs-from-us.

If you’re interested in going deeper on this topic I would recommend…

Any of the free films listed on this page generally about human consciousness transformation.

Any of the organizations listed here:

Science of Mind

Humanity’s Team

The Shift Network

and a personal favorite…

Agape International Spiritual Center

Shifting from Competition to Collaboration

I work for a company that designs and delivers strengths-based leadership development programs. What that often results in feedback from clients is a description of how our curriculum encouraged them to examine what was working in their management/leadership style and how they can utilize their strengths in new ways to improve ongoing challenges. I think one of the most powerful elements of the program is that we present a paradigm shift. A new way of thinking about their perception of the world based on what can be appreciated rather than focusing primarily on what is going wrong.

I was given a similar gift last weekend attending a seminar by Micheal and Ricki Beckwith. I’ve written about these powerful teachers before and am continually inspired by them. And although I’ve been listening to them for 15 years (!) I still find such depth and surprises in their soulful messages of song and word. One such message was around my paradigm of competition. I often find myself stuck in my desire for good in anything: love, money, gifted employment, creativity…and how that limits my belief that there is good left for others. Or, if others already have such wonderful experiences of some quality, it means there is less for me.

Take for example the recent realization that about 80% of my friends are partnered. Not all married, but nearly all are in serious long-term relationships. As I turned 30 just a few days ago, I reflected on how I was going to let this impact my desire for more love in my life, especially as I move towards single-hood again. After attending a recent party with my son as my date, I observed all the loving couples and frowned. I realized it bothered it more than I thought AND that my focusing on the absence of a partner made me more irritated that the partner was not yet here. But I SAY I don’t believe that a room full of loving couples means there is less likelihood of finding love for myself, but my reaction was one of competition: wanting to be one of those in the room as half of a loving couple!  I wish now I had heard Rev. Micheal’s words:

“Release the idea of competition, that the presence of good with someone else means less good for you. Goodness is omnipresent.”

The paradigm shift in that moment would have been to recognize the presence of appreciation, abundance, joy, peace, harmony swimming in the room. I could have considered how to deepen my display of parent-child love or friend-to-friend love which was also present in that moment.

Love was there waiting for me and I ignored it because I wanted it to look a certain way. But if I believe in the idea that goodness is everywhere-present, then I must also believe that it’s available in my life right now in more ways than I can imagine.

That’s what re-imagining peace is all about.